Monday, January 19, 2009

How Do You Blog?

Inspired by The Blog Platforms of Choice Among the Top 100 Bloggers, found via Stephen's Lighthouse, I decided to determine which blogging platforms are the most popular among librarian bloggers.

The Method: I used the 780 blogs listed in the LISZEN Wiki as the general library blogging population. I then randomly selected 275 blogs as a sample and recorded the blogging platform used for each blog. This gave me results with a 5% error margin and a 95% confidence level.

The Sample: The blogs included in the sample were both active and defunct blogs. Though one option would have been to exclude defunct blogs, they do represent librarians who have had blogs and have actively blogged in the past, which for this purpose, I have decided qualifies them as "bloggers." The sample also includes foreign language blogs and blogs which are sponsored by groups or organizations. Organizational blogs were included because, at the end of the day, it is most likely librarians who provide the content.

Granted, LISZEN is not the entire library blogging community, but I thought it an acceptable representation.

The Results: Although the more prominent bloggers (we all know who they are) don't tend to use Blogger, it is by far the platform of choice for the general population (as represented in LISZEN) followed distantly by Wordpress and even more distantly by Typepad.

The numbers shook out as follows: Blogger 150, Wordpress 70, Typepad 16, Moveable Type 12, LiveJournal 6, EduBlogs 3, Drupal 2, Blog-City 2, tBlog 2, and Other 12.

-Happy Blogging on Whatever Platform You Call Home

4 comments:

waltc said...

Or, you know, you could check the 511 blogs (of 607 in my book-length, massive study of blogs by library people) for which the program is obvious. As of June 2008, that yields 38% WordPress, 37% Blogger, 9% TypePad, 3% Movable Type, 1% LiveJournal. (WordPress includes WP software on many domains plus blogs at wordpress.com.)

waltc said...

A note: The percentages in the previous comment are of all blogs in the study, 607 in all. As percentages of the 511 blogs for which blogging software was clear (and was one of the "big players"), the percentages are 45% WordPress, 43% Blogger, 7% TypePad, 3.5% MovableType and 1% LiveJournal.

Sarah Lovato said...

A note on my above comment: In addition to including defunct/inactive blogs, I also included foreign language and blogs which are not personal, but organizational blogs, e.g. Building a Sustainable Future or ASC Online. Though they are "organizational," I included them because, most likely, librarians are responsible for the content.

That is to say,

Curious about Blogger's dominance on LISZEN, I compared my sample to "Blogs in The Liblog Landscape." 131 (nearly half of my sample) do not appear on your list (probably because they are defunct or inactive, foreign language, or organizational).

With Blogger and Wordpress, being so evenly matched in your list, adding the defunct or inactive blogs, more foreign language, or organizational blogs may have tilted that data towards Blogger as well, but your list is of current, personal blogs so their absence is perfectly logical.

Again

--Happy Blogging

Sarah L. said...

Where's the excitement in just reporting someone else's data? It's so much more fun to craft a pie chart instead of just inserting a link.

The discrepancy between the popularity of Blogger and Wordpress is interesting. Blogger coming out ahead in my survey is most likely the result of LISZEN as my population. Unlike "Blogs in The Liblog Landscape," LISZEN is not a snapshot of the current library blog population. As many of the blogs listed in LISZEN are now defunct, it may be better categorized as an archive.

One reason LISZEN may be overpopulated by Blogger may simply be that at the time LISZEN was in its heyday, Blogger was just more popular. Now as Wordpress has gained steam, LISZEN's popularity has slowed down, which is backed up by the fact that a huge number of blogs on your list are not found on LISZEN.

Curious about Blogger's dominance on LISZEN, I compared my sample to "Blogs in The Liblog Landscape." 131 (nearly half of my sample) do not appear on your list (probably because they are defunct or inactive). Of those 131, 79 were Blogger and only 23 were Wordpress. So the blogs that do not appear in your list lean heavily toward Blogger.

With Blogger and Wordpress, being so evenly matched in your list, adding the defunct or inactive blogs may have tilted that data towards Blogger as well, but your list is of current blogs, so their absence is perfectly logical.

At the end of the day, I decided to use LISZEN because it is one of the largest, independent, and easily-accessible lists of library blogs. I knew that many blogs were defunct or inactive, but chose to include them because my information does not reflect "current" blogs, but blogs that are or have been authored by librarians. Although my post never included the word "current," I have clarified that I did include defunct blogs in my survey to indicate my information reflects both past and present blogs.

This dialogue has inspired my next pie chart. Of the defunct blogs on LISZEN, which blogging platform yields the most defunct blogs? My guess is Blogger. If you already know the answer, don't tell me. I can't wait to make my pie chart.

--Happy Blogging